Change Location × Worldwide

    Find Me

    • Use Current Location

    Recent Locations

      Movie Reviews

      • Secret in Their Eyes poster image

        Secret in Their Eyes

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        In the languid remake "Secret in Their Eyes," the awkward missing "The" in its title poses a more intriguing mystery than anything on the screen. If you've never seen the 2009 original from Argentina, which won the Oscar for best foreign-language picture, do. It's extremely high-grade pulp, satisfying as a romance and a crime drama. Writer-director Billy Ray's Americanized redux isn't a disaster, exactly; it keeps its head down and does its job. But nothing quite gels, or ... (read more)

      • The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 2 poster image

        The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 2

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        Nothing lasts forever, except the "Hunger Games" franchise. Yet here we are. Forever is over. "The Hunger Games: Mockingjay -- Part 2" brings the four-film saga of Katniss Everdeen and her revolutionary war to a dutiful, fairly satisfying if undeniably attenuated conclusion. Following the lucrative "Twilight" template, there was simply too much money at stake here to prevent the third "Hunger Games" book in novelist Suzanne Collins' trilogy from being h... (read more)

      • My All American poster image

        My All American

        Colin Covert, Chicago Tribune

        There are three specific events at which a manly man is allowed to cry: the death of his mother, the birth of his daughter and a sports movie. That's where we get go-for-the-jugular real life tear-jerkers like "Brian's Song," "Friday Night Lights" and "My All American." Angelo Pizzo, screenwriter of "Rudy" and "Hoosiers," provided both script and direction for this biography of University of Texas Austin's beloved player Freddie Steinmark. Men... (read more)

      • Suffragette poster image


        Katie Walsh, Chicago Tribune

        The story of women fighting for the right to vote is all too recent, and for some, all too forgotten. Director Sarah Gavron and writer Abi Morgan bring the history of the British suffragette movement to bear in the film "Suffragette," as a reminder of the struggles that have come before, and the achievements that have yet to be won. The resulting film is dark and unglamorous, but it burns with a determined fire, giving these women a revolutionary hero treatment. "Suffragette&qu... (read more)

      • The 33 poster image

        The 33

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        Going into "The 33," we know a few things. We know it'll be tense, and largely subterranean. We know it's a bad-news/good-news story, in that order, about the 2010 mine explosion and cave-in stranding 33 workers for 69 excruciating days in the depths of a gold and copper mine in Chile's Atacama Desert. The ordeal and eventual rescue of all 33 became the stuff of gripping reality television around the world. Mining is innately risky work, especially in mines with lousy safety records... (read more)

      • Miss You Already poster image

        Miss You Already

        Katie Walsh, Chicago Tribune

        Female friendship fable "Miss You Already" presents itself as a sort of "Beaches" for the 21st century, announcing its tearjerking intentions right there in the title. If this is your kind of thing, you may have already bought your tickets to enjoy a slice of friendship fantasy and a good cry. The presence of beloved actresses Drew Barrymore and Toni Collette also sweetens the pot. But in endeavoring to deliver buckets of tearful catharsis, the efforts of "Miss You Al... (read more)

      • Spectre poster image


        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        "Spectre" cost nearly $300 million to make, and I suppose it was worth it. It's a good Bond movie, which will be good enough for many millions of fans. It's also the longest Bond movie in existence, clocking in at just under 2 1/2 decadent, carefree, flamboyantly destructive hours. This time Ian Fleming's well-dressed assassin changes clothes from Mexico City to Rome, from London to the Austrian mountains, from Tangier back to London, where terrorists-entrepreneurs carrying the fami... (read more)

      • Burnt poster image


        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        In "Burnt," playing a brilliant, tormented American chef clawing his way to the top of the London culinary scene, Bradley Cooper throws more tantrums than a season's worth of "Rugrats." The movie is devoted three ways: to the character's reckless past as an apprentice in Paris, drink and drugs and women strewn in his wake; to his lust for the validation of a coveted third Michelin star rating ("I want people to be sick with longing," he says of his cooking ambiti... (read more)

      • Our Brand Is Crisis poster image

        Our Brand Is Crisis

        Katie Walsh, Chicago Tribune

        The Sandra Bullock-starring "Our Brand Is Crisis" is an acidic, biting political satire that asserts the notion that marketing has taken over the democratic process. There's truth in that thesis, especially since the film is based on a documentary of the same name that captured the machinations of American political and branding consultants for hire during a 2002 election in Bolivia. For director David Gordon Green, it's a step in a new, more sophisticated direction, and for produce... (read more)

      • Jem and the Holograms poster image

        Jem and the Holograms

        Katie Walsh, Chicago Tribune

        The beloved 1980s cartoon series "Jem and the Holograms" gets a millennial makeover in the live action film of the same name. Director Jon M. Chu, of several "Step Up" installments, as well as the "G.I. Joe" live action franchise, adapts the kooky cartoon about a girl band with special futuristic powers to the YouTube generation, where anyone can be a star. With a strong self-empowerment message, "Jem and the Holograms" shoots squarely for a tween audie... (read more)

      • Rock the Kasbah poster image

        Rock the Kasbah

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        "Safe as milk." That's the phrase used by the yahoo weapons merchant played by Danny McBride, as he describes a transaction involving guns and ammo, conveyed to Pashtun rebel forces in Afghanistan. His unlikely go-between in this desert landscape: Richie Lanz, the visiting LA talent manager portrayed by the great Bill Murray in the not-good "Rock the Kasbah." "Safe as milk" also describes the film itself. On the other hand, star vehicles this rickety have a way o... (read more)

      • Steve Jobs poster image

        Steve Jobs

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        "Steve Jobs," a dazzling shell of a biopic from screenwriter Aaron Sorkin and director Danny Boyle, is a three-act backstage drama about a bullying, insecure, overbearing visionary who learns to be a better father and less of a jerk in the nick of time. His products may be the ones on which you're reading this review right now. In the film's eyes, that fact exonerates him from the other, messier stuff. The last 10 minutes of the movie are bad in a cushy, sentimental way that may hel... (read more)

      • The Last Witch Hunter poster image

        The Last Witch Hunter

        Katie Walsh, Chicago Tribune

        What to make of "The Last Witch Hunter"? What a curious conundrum. It's too self-reflective to be an entertaining mess of unintentional hilarity, but none of the actual scripted punchlines land. The premise itself, while definitely out there, could possibly work, if the nonsensical screenplay didn't throw everything at it to see what sticks. There are moments where it achieves the highest camp, and times where it strives for something attempting dark grittiness, and that middle grou... (read more)

      • Bridge of Spies poster image

        Bridge of Spies

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        It's brilliant, really. What's the quickest way to establish the humanity of two leading characters in a Cold War drama? Give them both the sniffles. "Bridge of Spies" does that, and more. The film is an anomaly -- a confident, slightly square, highly satisfying example of old-school Hollywood craftsmanship, starring a major movie star brandishing a briefcase, and a handkerchief, rather than a pistol. The trailers for director Steven Spielberg's first film since the 2012 "Linco... (read more)

      • Crimson Peak poster image

        Crimson Peak

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        You may come out of the 1901-set Gothic chiller "Crimson Peak" humming the production design (by Thomas Sanders), or singing arias about the clothes (Kate Hawley, costume designer), or composing symphonies of praise for the mellow, honeyed menace of the cinematography (Dan Laustsen). If looks made the movie, and they can in the right circumstances, this movie would be made. "Crimson Peak" represents not-quite-right circumstances. It's the latest from co-writer and director... (read more)

      • Goosebumps poster image


        Katie Walsh, Chicago Tribune

        Silly, spooky monster mash-up "Goosebumps" doesn't have to be as good as it is. Slyly smarter and more entertaining than it appears, adults might have just as much fun as the kids who will undoubtedly gobble up this Halloween treat. A sort of PG version of "Cabin in the Woods," this adaptation of R.L. Stine's series of young adult horror novels is bolstered by a stellar comedic cast, headed up by the inimitable Jack Black in the role of the author. With so many "Goose... (read more)

      • 99 Homes poster image

        99 Homes

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        Well before 1925, when the Marx Brothers cavorted through a story about the Florida real estate craze in "The Cocoanuts" on Broadway, the Sunshine State real estate explosion became the boom heard around the world. But explosions go both ways, semantically speaking. When a housing market "blows up," it can mean success or failure, money or disaster. Or money made on the backs of other people's disaster. The storyline in the tense new drama "99 Homes," set in 2010... (read more)

      • He Named Me Malala poster image

        He Named Me Malala

        Katie Walsh, Chicago Tribune

        Chances are, you're already familiar with Malala Yousafszai, the young activist and Nobel laureate who survived being shot in the head by the Taliban in Pakistan. But with Davis Guggenheim's new documentary, "He Named Me Malala," based on her memoir, "I Am Malala," you'll get to know the remarkable girl in a much more intimate and illuminating light. While the film itself is plagued with structural storytelling issues that are at best emotionally numbing, at worst confound... (read more)

      • Pan poster image


        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        In "Pan," young Peter learns he can fly in the grimmest possible context, as he plummets to his presumptive death after being kicked, viciously, off a plank hundreds of feet above a rock quarry. In the new film directed by Joe Wright, Neverland lies high above the clouds as usual, but much of its real estate has been turned over to a miserable steampunk mining village in the "Mad Max: Fury Road" vein. Kidnapped slave boys dig for Pixum, also known as pixie dust. The precio... (read more)

      • The Walk poster image

        The Walk

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        If only. If only, for the benefit of other filmmakers exploring the same material, we could un-see a great film and clear our memories of it. One such film is the 2008 documentary "Man on Wire," James Marsh's account of what happened the morning of Aug. 7, 1974, when French aerialist Philippe Petit wire-walked between the twin towers of the World Trade Center. Eight times, he crossed that wire, 1,350 feet above the streets of lower Manhattan. The act of trespassing was not legal and... (read more)

      • Sicario poster image


        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        For a gripping documentary about the U.S./Mexico border, the drug trade and a hornet's nest of sociopolitical nightmares, watch Matthew Heineman's "Cartel Land." For a commercial thriller on related themes, "Sicario" will do. The first hour of this latest film from French-Canadian director Denis Villeneuve is sleek, terrific pulp. The second half of "Sicario" (in Mexico, slang for "hitman") settles for more conventional bloodshed and storytelling. Such ... (read more)

      • The Martian poster image

        The Martian

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        A highly enjoyable, zestily acted team-building exercise, with Matt Damon playing the team of one, director Ridley Scott's "The Martian" throws a series of life-or-death scenarios at its resourceful botanist-astronaut, stranded on Mars but making the most of it. It's one of the most comforting science fiction films in years. "I'm not gonna die here," Damon's character, Mark Watney, declares early on to the camera. Left for dead by his crew amid a monstrous windstorm, in wh... (read more)

      • Stonewall poster image


        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        Somehow, director Roland Emmerich has made a movie even less historically accurate than "10,000 BC," the one depicting Egyptian-style pyramids being constructed with the help of woolly mammoths. But facts are not the problem with "Stonewall." This is not a documentary, and it owes no one any kind of objectivity or documentary truth on its subject, only a vivid and persuasive fictionalized version of events. The real problem is that its narrative inventions embrace every wr... (read more)

      • The Green Inferno poster image

        The Green Inferno

        Katie Walsh, Chicago Tribune

        What's the point of watching horror movies? An often argued reason is catharsis. Horror movies have a unique way of dredging up cultural anxieties and playing them to their worst ends on screen, so when the lights come up, we can say, "it's only a movie," and dismiss those fears away. Eli Roth has managed to do this in artful, cheeky ways with his films "Cabin Fever" (flesh-eating viruses!) and "Hostel" and "Hostel Part II" (commercialized torture!). In... (read more)

      • The Intern poster image

        The Intern

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        Nicely acted by Anne Hathaway and Robert De Niro, the artificial sweetener titled "The Intern" has its bright spots but is practically blinded by its own privileged perspective of life among the landed gentry of Brooklyn. It's not fair to single out the writer-director, Nancy Meyers, whose better work includes "Something's Gotta Give" and "It's Complicated," for making high-end escapist fantasies about a certain socioeconomic strata. Most Hollywood products work ... (read more)

      • Black Mass poster image

        Black Mass

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        Turns out the thing Johnny Depp's career needed was simple. He needed to play a type of role relatively new to him, even if it's relatively familiar to the rest of us. Some scenes in the solid, vividly acted gangster picture "Black Mass" come from real life, or something like it. These trade off with scenes yanked straight out of the movies. In a major "GoodFellas" moment, Depp, as South Boston underworld kingpin James "Whitey" Bulger, has been invited over for s... (read more)

      • Captive poster image


        Colin Covert, Chicago Tribune

        No star ranking David Oyelowo, the picture of principled honor as Dr. Martin Luther King in "Selma," delivers unmitigated evil as the murderer at the heart of "Captive." He plays psychopath Brian Nichols, whose 2005 murder spree terrified Atlanta. As he did before, Oyelowo explores issues of suffering and spiritual salvation in mature, realistic terms. For a second time, he has won over this impious viewer completely. Both faith-based and fact-based, "Captive" is... (read more)

      • Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials poster image

        Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        As I write this, it's a lovely, breezy, sunny day, so thoughts turn naturally to the latest dystopian hellhole at the movies, "Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials." A year ago the inaugural "Maze Runner" adaptation proved a pleasantly unpleasant surprise. Director Wes Ball's feature film debut delivered the first in author James Dashner's trilogy (he wrote two prequels as well) with an earnest, no-nonsense commitment to the protagonist's waking nightmare. From last year's Tribu... (read more)

      • 90 Minutes in Heaven poster image

        90 Minutes in Heaven

        Katie Walsh, Chicago Tribune

        Not all stories are created equal. Amazing true stories can be remarkable for their sheer wonder and seemingly unbelievable qualities -- but those details might not translate into an amazing movie. This is the case with "90 Minutes in Heaven," based on the best-selling book of the same name by Don Piper. Based on his own incredible life story, the film adaptation, written and directed by Michael Polish, is an all-too-faithful rendition of this spiritual tale, where minor details get... (read more)

      • Goodnight Mommy poster image

        Goodnight Mommy

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        Pristinely vicious, the Austrian thriller "Goodnight Mommy" spins a fairy tale about twin boys, played by Lukas and Elias Schwarz, who live in a sleek, scarily minimalist country home with their mother, a television personality (we gather through a few clues) portrayed by Susanne Wuest. Outside this soulless abode, the boys spend their days romping in a bucolic playground, dashing through rows of corn, exploring the woods nearby. Mom has changed, however. She has returned home from ... (read more)

      • The Perfect Guy poster image

        The Perfect Guy

        Nick Schager, Chicago Tribune

        Variety Sanaa Lathan is as tough as she is fetching, which is why it's so disheartening to watch her play a dopey victim for much of "The Perfect Guy," in which her well-to-do professional is terrorized by a new flame who doesn't take kindly to being dumped. Boasting a screenplay by Tyger Williams that never fails to telegraph its every move, David M. Rosenthal's film is a cheap "Fatal Attraction" knockoff, complete with a subplot involving the potentially dire fate of Lat... (read more)

      • The Visit poster image

        The Visit

        Cary Darling, Chicago Tribune

        Remember what the world was like when anyone last cared about an M. Night Shyamalan movie? George W. Bush was in the White House, Vanessa Carlton was on the radio, and you couldn't tweet about how cool you thought "Signs" was because Twitter wasn't even around yet. The early 2000s seem like several lifetimes ago, especially for the director who soared early in his career with "The Sixth Sense," "Unbreakable" and, yes, "Signs," and then spiraled into cre... (read more)

      • Mistress America poster image

        Mistress America

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        It's a 90-year-old song lyric, but Lorenz Hart's description of Manhattan (from the song "Manhattan") as a "wondrous toy" holds newfound allure for the bright young things -- 21st century moderns -- populating Noah Baumbach's latest chamber-screwball outing, "Mistress America." In "Frances Ha," director and co-writer Baumbach's previous collaboration with co-writer, star and romantic partner Greta Gerwig, the protagonist was a sweet, creative, thwarted ... (read more)

      • The Transporter Refueled poster image

        The Transporter Refueled

        Katie Walsh, Chicago Tribune

        You'll see much to applaud in the B-movie action pleasures on display in "Transporter Refueled." You can't do much better than this for a last gasp of mindless cinematic summer fun. The thing about "Transporter Refueled" is that it actually is fun -- chock-a-block with breathtaking stunts, plot twists and visual treats. Just don't think too hard about it or you might ruin the ride. A reboot of the Luc Besson-helmed "Transporter" series of the early aughts, this f... (read more)

      • A Walk in the Woods poster image

        A Walk in the Woods

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        In the wake of "Wild," in which Reese Witherspoon's version of Cheryl Strayed hiked the Pacific Crest Trail and reckoned with her demons, we now have "Mild," better known as "A Walk in the Woods." It stars Robert Redford and Nick Nolte as travel writer Bill Bryson and his buddy, fictionalized by Bryson as "Stephen Katz," having a go at the Appalachian Trail for a little light banter and a casual insight or two regarding life's highways. The project grew... (read more)

      • Learning to Drive poster image

        Learning to Drive

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        "Learning to Drive," not to be confused with the Corey Haim/Corey Feldman vehicle "License to Drive," comes from an autobiographical 2002 New Yorker article by essayist Katha Pollitt. In the magazine piece, later published in a Pollitt collection of stories, the longtime nondriving Manhattan resident bounces back from a breakup with a womanizing jerk (I'm taking her point of view) by grabbing the wheel of her own life, through driving lessons. At one point Pollitt imagines... (read more)

      • No Escape poster image

        No Escape

        Katie Walsh, Chicago Tribune

        If what you're seeking in the doldrums of August is stomach-churning, eye-watering suspense, "No Escape" delivers just that, but it falls short with a tone-deaf story and extremely xenophobic worldview. Clearly, brother filmmaking duo Drew and John Erick Dowdle were not paying attention to the backlash that greeted "The Impossible," which followed the plight of a rich, white family's desperate escape from the Thai tsunami, at the expense of the stories of the Thai people. ... (read more)

      • American Ultra poster image

        American Ultra

        Katie Walsh, Chicago Tribune

        A soup spoon turns lethal in the unlikely hands of sweet and spacy stoner Mike (Jesse Eisenberg) in the violently paranoid action comedy "American Ultra." Mike's a lot like the spoon -- harmless unless deployed in the right way -- because he used to be a particularly effective "asset" at the CIA, a term used to describe highly trained super-killers. But the program was shut down, Mike's memories replaced with serious phobias, and he was planted in a sleepy West Virginia to... (read more)

      • Grandma poster image


        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        We don't get to choose when or where we fall in love with a performer; sometimes it happens when they're doing Ingmar Bergman, and sometimes it's "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In." Lily Tomlin joined the cast of that cherished relic of a sketch comedy TV show in 1970, and very quickly millions became her comedy slaves, thanks to Ernestine, her purse-lipped telephone operator, and to Edith Ann, the fidgety wonder of a 5-year-old in the oversize rocking chair. In short order Tomlin, now 75,... (read more)

      • Hitman: Agent 47 poster image

        Hitman: Agent 47

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        If you see one movie about governmentally modified assassins this weekend, don't make it "Hitman: Agent 47." "American Ultra" is the far superior take on the unknowing superspy, because it takes itself far less seriously and can actually poke fun at the genre. "Hitman: Agent 47" was just never going to be able to keep up, especially with its overly serious take on the genre. It's so coldblooded, it's practically reptilian. Directed by newcomer Aleksander Bach, wi... (read more)

      • Sinister 2 poster image

        Sinister 2

        Katie Walsh, Chicago Tribune

        Horror sequel "Sinister 2" is a very strange movie. Of course, it's a horror film, so strange, ghostly, and sinister events are expected. Yet this is a horror film that doesn't quite know what it is. You can't tell if the filmmakers (director CiarĂ¡n Foy and screenwriters Scott Derrickson and C. Robert Cargill) are deliberately going for a bit of a goofy, throwback feel, but that's what comes across in this spooky tale. It's almost like an '80s movie you'd find on cable, and that mig... (read more)

      • Rosenwald poster image


        Kenneth Turan, Chicago Tribune

        Los Angeles Times "Rosenwald" used to be a name to conjure with, but no more, and that is a shame this vivid, engaging documentary attempts to do something about. In the early years of the 20th century, Julius Rosenwald was a philanthropist on a colossal scale, giving away what has been estimated as close to a billion dollars in today's money. But as revealed by writer-director Aviva Kempner, it's not just the amount of money he donated that makes Rosenwald special, it's the specifi... (read more)

      • Straight Outta Compton poster image

        Straight Outta Compton

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        "Straight Outta Compton" is a musically propulsive mixed blessing of a biopic, made the way these things often get made: with the real-life protagonists breathing down the movie's neck to make sure nothing too harsh or unflattering gets in the way of the telling. Three of the film's producers are Ice Cube (born O'Shea Jackson), Dr. Dre (Andre Young) and Tomica Woods-Wright, the widow of Eric "Eazy-E" Wright. As relayed by director F. Gary Gray, the rise of South Central L.... (read more)

      • The Man From U.N.C.L.E. poster image

        The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        Some movies are hung up on their own moves, and they can be terrific fun if they're directed by someone who knows how and when to move a camera. But other movies get hung up on their own looks, which is a different, vainglorious story. Director and co-writer Guy Ritchie's "The Man From U.N.C.L.E.," inspired by the 1964-1968 TV series that rode the James Bond wave, tells a tale of nice suits, pretty sunglasses and actors posing, not acting. The male stars are Henry Cavill (the curren... (read more)

      • Ricki and the Flash poster image

        Ricki and the Flash

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        "Ricki and the Flash" comes from director Jonathan Demme, whose good and great films include "Melvin and Howard," "Swing Shift," "Stop Making Sense," "Something Wild," "Married to the Mob" and, seven years ago, "Rachel Getting Married." (He's made a few others, of course, among them "The Silence of the Lambs," which won him an Oscar.) Diablo Cody, an Oscar winner for "Juno" and a fascinating purveyor of ... (read more)

      • Mission: Impossible Rogue Nation poster image

        Mission: Impossible Rogue Nation

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        With the new "Mission: Impossible" movie, even if it's the most assured and satisfying of the five so far, it sounds foolish to even mention the things the characters say in between screeching tires, gunfights, knife fights, motorcycle derring-do, and the opening act featuring Tom Cruise dangling for real (real enough to make it look cool, and frightening) on the outside of a plane high over a Belarus airstrip. But it isn't foolish. One of the many pleasures of "Mission: Imposs... (read more)

      • The End of the Tour poster image

        The End of the Tour

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        A clever, gently provocative movie about talking, listening and competing interests, "The End of the Tour" is a two-character play that managed to hitch a ride as a road movie directed by James Ponsoldt, whose previous films include "The Spectacular Now" and "Smashed." In March 1996, starting at his house outside the college town of Normal, Illinois State University professor and "Infinite Jest" author David Foster Wallace turned five days of his life o... (read more)

      • Vacation poster image


        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        There must be some sort of Dr. Seuss contraption shared among Hollywood studios called the Unfunny-izer, hauled out and set to sputtering when it comes time for the latest depressing remake of a comedy. The new "Vacation" must've been run through it twice. This is a grim reboot of the franchise begun in 1983 with director Harold Ramis' hit, which was adapted and expanded by John Hughes from his own National Lampoon short story "Vacation '58." In the '83 movie, Clark (Chevy... (read more)

      • Mr. Holmes poster image

        Mr. Holmes

        Colin Covert, Chicago Tribune

        With Robert Downey Jr. making him a skull-cracking action hero, and Benedict Cumberbatch making him a high-functioning sociopath, what sort of Sherlock Holmes yarn can add fresh story material? How about Ian McKellen playing the immortal character as we've never seen him before? The Sherlock we meet in "Mr. Holmes" is a man of growing frailties, gently portrayed. Well into the dusk of his life at 93, his recollection has declined worryingly. The long-retired consulting detective als... (read more)

      • Southpaw poster image


        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        A flurry of haymakers in the form of boxing movie cliches, "Southpaw" was conceived as a loose remake of "The Champ" -- Wallace Beery in 1931, Jon Voight in 1979 -- tailored for Marshall Mathers, also known as Eminem. The rage-iest rap star on the planet took the initial meetings with director Antoine Fuqua and screenwriter Kurt Sutter. Eminem eventually bowed out, affording Fuqua ("Training Day," "The Equalizer") and Sutter ("The Shield," &qu... (read more)

      • Ant-Man poster image


        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        "Ant-Man" has been skittering around the development corridors of Hollywood so long, the earliest unproduced screenplays about the tiny superhero actually preceded the Disney film "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids." That was another age (1989), decades before our present Age of Ultron -- an epoch of expensive cheap thrills dictated by the steady, crushing rollout of so many Marvel movies that even the good ones start to seem like ants at an endless picnic. But wait. The "Ant-... (read more)

      • The Look of Silence poster image

        The Look of Silence

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        More than a companion piece -- it's more contemplative and focused than the film preceding it -- Joshua Oppenheimer's quietly devastating documentary "The Look of Silence" wouldn't have been possible without the 2012 project that brought Oppenheimer international renown, "The Act of Killing." In that earlier project, various and thriving perpetrators of the Indonesian genocide of 1965-66 spoke to Oppenheimer on camera to talk about what happened. The filmmaker asked them t... (read more)

      • The Stanford Prison Experiment poster image

        The Stanford Prison Experiment

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        "The Stanford Prison Experiment" plays like the most unnerving improvisational theater game imaginable. In 1971, social psychology professor Philip Zimbardo set up a two-week study in the basement of a Stanford University campus building. He wanted to prove one of two things. One: The brutality and dehumanization in a prison setting was "dispositional," tied to the personalities of the prison guards and the prisoners. Or two: The brutality was "situational," an i... (read more)

      • Trainwreck poster image


        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        If you've seen "Spy" with Melissa McCarthy, you're already aware that the movie nails its first big laugh -- the sneezing-assassin joke -- within moments of the opening credits. Even if you know it's coming, the timing is just right. And right away you think: There. Thank you. These people know what they're doing. How often does that thought run through your mind in a mainstream commercial comedy? Not often enough. It didn't happen with "Ted 2," which may be a moderate box... (read more)

      • Amy poster image


        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        The saddest moment in Asif Kapadia's new documentary "Amy," and there are many, occurs relatively late in the 27 years lived by its subject, Amy Winehouse. The North London singer-songwriter with the tornado hair and heartbreaking grin is on stage at an Isle of Wight concert. This time she's not smiling. Smashed, strung out or both, she grinds through yet another performance of her signature hit, "Rehab," the one with the irresistible '60s girl-group hook and the blithe de... (read more)

      • Minions poster image


        Rick Bentley, Chicago Tribune

        It's the role of a minion to be a servile follower of a person in charge. That means they are resigned to playing the supporting role. That's the problem with the new animated comedy "Minions." The pill-shaped, yellow characters introduced in "Despicable Me" as the subordinates to the villainous Gru have now taken center stage. The charm and humor they brought in tiny doses in the previous films now come in a massive blast that wears thin quickly. "Minions" start... (read more)

      • Jimmy's Hall poster image

        Jimmy's Hall

        Lindsey Bahr, Chicago Tribune

        Associated Press Jimmy Gralton is not a name you've likely heard before. A modest Irish revolutionary, Gralton has the dubious distinction of being the only native to ever be deported from Ireland. On top of leading a communist group in the provincial county of Leitrim in the 1930s, he incited fear in the ruling classes by running what they viewed as a particularly mutinous establishment: A dance hall. The history books may have yet to give his story a comprehensive treatment, but in "Ji... (read more)

      • Magic Mike XXL poster image

        Magic Mike XXL

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        "Magic Mike XXL" comes up a little short compared with the original, director Steven Soderbergh's blithe and bonny Channing Tatum showcase inspired by Tatum's salad days as a male stripper. This time the jokes are heavier, more on-the-nose, though a surprising percentage of them work anyway. And yet the sequel earns its singles, reasons that are simple and quite unusual. Feel free to quit reading the review here, because why lie? You've already determined whether you're going to see... (read more)

      • Jurassic World poster image

        Jurassic World

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        Bailed out by a few good jolts, "Jurassic World" gets by, barely, as a marauding-dinosaurs narrative designed for a more jaded audience than the one "Jurassic Park" conquered back in 1993. Why was director Steven Spielberg's film version of the Michael Crichton novel a hit? In an industry built on high-concept pitches, the first film pitched the highest. Dinos brought back to life; trouble ensues. Digital effects, smoothly integrated with animatronics, made a quantum leap ... (read more)

      • Spy poster image


        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        Last year, in the Bill Murray vehicle "St. Vincent," Melissa McCarthy did something she'd never done before in the movies. She did less. Her role, neither a wallflower nor the raunchy life of the party, required an easier, lower-key brand of comic truth than the material for which she'd become rich and famous, on TV in "Mike and Molly," and in the movies. She came through. Like many highly skilled actors, McCarthy is consistently a little better than her material, and when... (read more)

      • San Andreas poster image

        San Andreas

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars. The fault is the star of "San Andreas," a fairly entertaining weapon of mass destruction reminding us that life's blessings come to those who receive preferential billing. We may as well call it "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Earthquake," though the tremors in "San Andreas" aren't so much mad as disappointed. So many Californians to wipe out in only 107 minutes of screen time! That's 51 minutes shorter than Roland Emmerich... (read more)

      • I'll See You in My Dreams poster image

        I'll See You in My Dreams

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        Our attraction to the movies starts from simple building blocks: a face, a heart-wrenching separation, a pratfall. But here are two simple pleasures I defy anyone to argue against. I speak of Blythe Danner's and Sam Elliott's speaking voices. Both instruments are showcased in the modest, Kickstarter-funded heartwarmer "I'll See You in My Dreams." To reiterate what others have already noted, it's stupidly uncommon for an American indie (let alone a better-funded studio project) to gi... (read more)

      • Mad Max: Fury Road poster image

        Mad Max: Fury Road

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        You remember "Happy Feet." This is George Miller's "Happy Wheels." The creator of the original "Mad Max" trilogy has whipped up a gargantuan grunge symphony of vehicular mayhem that makes "Furious 7" look like "Curious George." The full title of Miller's remake of "Mad Max" is "Mad Max: Fury Road." It stars Tom Hardy, who says very little, in the old Mel Gibson role of the post-apocalyptic road warrior. Here the character's... (read more)

      • Where Hope Grows poster image

        Where Hope Grows

        Roger Moore, Chicago Tribune

        "Where Hope Grows" is a sometimes moving and generally watchable melodrama about a drunken ex-ballplayer who finds purpose and a friend back in his home town. But unlike most faith-based films, it isn't a church that saves him, or a pastor or devout Christian who shows him the way. It's a teen with Down syndrome. The kid's nicknamed Produce, thanks to his job at the local supermarket. That's where Calvin Campbell (Kristoffer Polaha) stumbles into him. Calvin's a single-dad whose tee... (read more)

      • Avengers: Age of Ultron poster image

        Avengers: Age of Ultron

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        When I say "Avengers: Age of Ultron" won't disappoint a majority of its pre-sold, culturally obligated fans around the world -- the world perpetually on the verge of extinction in the Marvel universe -- you know what I mean. You know what the movie promises, and would be foolish, or inept, not to deliver. Action, relentless and assaultive. Wisecracks, numerous, pretty sharp and evenly parceled out among Robert Downey Jr. (Iron Man), Chris Hemsworth (Thor), Mark Ruffalo (Hulk), Chris... (read more)

      • True Story poster image

        True Story

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        "True Story" a case of a well-crafted film, made by a first-time feature director with an impressive theatrical pedigree, that nonetheless struggles to locate the reasons for telling its story. That story comes from the 2005 memoir by Michael Finkel, played in "True Story" by Jonah Hill. In 2002, writing for The New York Times Sunday magazine, journalist Finkel disgraced himself by fabricating an interview subject -- a composite cooked up with details and quotes from sever... (read more)

      • Home poster image


        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        The cuddliest alien invasion movie ever, "Home" contains nifty turns of phrase and some actual, verifiable verbal wit, owing in large part to its source material, Adam Rex's 2007 children's book "The True Meaning of Smekday." In the grand Hollywood tradition, DreamWorks Animation threw out most of that book (and the film's original title, "Happy Smekday!") after optioning the property seven years ago. Even though screenwriters Tom J. Astle and Matt Ember over-pac... (read more)

      • Merchants of Doubt poster image

        Merchants of Doubt

        Kenneth Turan, Chicago Tribune

        Los Angeles Times Don't underestimate Robert Kenner's "Merchants of Doubt." It may sound like a standard-issue advocacy documentary concerned, as so many are, with the perils of global warming, but it's a lot more than that. It's not just that "Merchants of Doubt" is loaded with jazzy visuals and starts with a performance by close-up magician Jamy Ian Swiss. This enthralling film, based on the book by Naomi Oreskes and Erik M. Conway, is as fascinating as it is horrifying.... (read more)

      • McFarland, USA poster image

        McFarland, USA

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        A less talented and more shameless director might've turned it into cornmeal mush, but Niki Caro ("Whale Rider") has delivered unto the Disney corporation a Kevin Costner sports movie that works. Commercially? We'll see. But as an inspirational true story, fictionalized to the usual degree, it works. "McFarland, USA" is good news for a lot of reasons. One: Costner's previous film, "Black or White," was pretty lousy. Two: Upbeat, inspirational films about cross-co... (read more)

      • Annie poster image


        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        It brings no pleasure to report this, especially when the distributing studio, Sony, is dealing with a monstrous hacking scandal and a hard-knock year. Let's put it charitably. The risks taken by co-writer and director Will Gluck ("Easy A," "Friends With Benefits," both quite good) begin with pulling "Annie" out of the 1930s and plopping it down in contemporary Manhattan. Living in foster care up in Harlem, the girl formerly known as "orphan" (each time... (read more)

      • Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb poster image

        Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        "Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb," otherwise known as "Night at the Museum 3," rates as more determinedly heartfelt than the first and not as witty as the second (and best). Also, no Amy Adams as Amelia Earhart in jodhpurs this time around. "Night at the Museum 3" closes out director Shawn Levy's effects-driven, family-friendly trilogy with three separate farewells. The most bittersweet parting involves the late Robin Williams. It's both touching and diff... (read more)

      • Top Five poster image

        Top Five

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        "I don't feel funny anymore," complains the movie star played by Chris Rock in "Top Five," but don't worry. Unlike Woody Allen's "Stardust Memories," this cinematic confessional, which is also a genial wish-fulfillment fantasy, is actually funny. It's also indulgent, uneven and naggingly misogynist, which is weird, given how sharp writer-director Rock has been on any number of other subjects lately. In the runup to the release of "Top Five," Rock has be... (read more)

      • Horrible Bosses 2 poster image

        Horrible Bosses 2

        Justin Chang, Chicago Tribune

        Variety At the risk of suggesting that "Horrible Bosses 2" has a compelling reason to exist, it's worth noting that the movie does function, on one level, as an anti-capitalist revenge fantasy aimed at the excesses of the 1 percent. Mainly, however, this inane and incredibly tasteless sequel qualifies as an excuse to bring back those hard-working funnymen Jason Bateman, Charlie Day and Jason Sudeikis for another round of amateur-criminal high jinks and semi-improvised vulgarity, jab... (read more)

      • The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 poster image

        The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        In honor of the title we'll break this part of the sentence with a colon, and then use a portentous dash: "The Hunger Games: Mockingjay -- Part 1" is a worthy third movie in the Suzanne Collins franchise -- destined to satisfy the legions of filmgoers willing to swing with a lot of scheming and skulking in an underground bunker resembling the world's most frightening Marriott, in order to get to the revolution. The third book in Collins' dystopian-literature juggernaut has been halv... (read more)

      • Beyond the Lights poster image

        Beyond the Lights

        Roger Moore, Chicago Tribune

        "Beyond the Lights" is another pain-behind-the-music romance. But it's so well written, cast and played that we lose ourselves in the comfort food familiarity of it all. This hip-hop-era "Bodyguard" has heart and soul, thanks to stars Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Minnie Driver and Nate Parker. Simple as it is, it simply works. Mbatha-Raw shows a totally different set of skills from those on display in her breakout period piece hit "Belle." As rising hip-hop phenom Noni, she ... (read more)

      • Dumb and Dumber To poster image

        Dumb and Dumber To

        Roger Moore, Chicago Tribune

        Twenty years after they permanently lowered the bar on broad and dumb character comedies, Lloyd and Harry are back, "Dumb and Dumber" than ever in "Dumb and Dumber To." And within moments of the opening credits, you may find yourself overcome with sentimental warmth at seeing two 50-something actors as characters that the years have not made smarter. Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels energetically reprise their popular roles, and the warmth follows. Those fart joke farceurs, the... (read more)

      • Big Hero 6 poster image

        Big Hero 6

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        "Big Hero 6" we have a robot considerably more beguiling than his movie. Yet there's enough visual invention afoot, and enough spirited interplay among the human characters, to keep things bobbing along. Baymax is the name of the robot in question. He resembles a flotation device or the Michelin Man's blobbier brother. He and his adventures come from the pages of Marvel Comics, which marks a first for Disney animation. It will not be the last; Disney's purchase of Marvel five years ... (read more)

      • Laggies poster image


        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        In "Laggies," Keira Knightley tries on a generic American dialect. Based on the results, the actress defines that as "nasal, and how!" Her character, Megan, is 28 years old and a Seattle native. She has thus far let life happen to her, and around her. She lacks a career (she freelances as a sign-twirler for her accountant father, played by Jeff Garlin) and finds herself through another year of a lengthy relationship with her boyfriend, nice but dull, played by Mark Webber.... (read more)

      • Gone Girl poster image

        Gone Girl

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        David Fincher's film version of the Gillian Flynn bestseller "Gone Girl" is a stealthy, snake-like achievement. It's everything the book was and more -- more, certainly, in its sinister, brackish atmosphere dominated by mustard-yellow fluorescence, designed to make you squint, recoil and then lean in a little closer. So often in Fincher's movies, and especially in this one, actors are placed precisely against a window, or in shadows surrounded by low-wattage electric light sources. ... (read more)

      • The Boxtrolls poster image

        The Boxtrolls

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        Fans of "Coraline" and "ParaNorman," the deft, eccentric supernatural fairy tales created by Oregon-based Laika animation house, have every reason to anticipate "The Boxtrolls." Laika's latest feature is based on Alan Snow's 2005 book "Here Be Monsters!" part one of "The Ratbridge Chronicles." For the film's purposes, the mythical hilltop town of Ratbridge has changed its name to Cheesebridge. Something else has changed en route to the screen.... (read more)

      • The Notebook poster image

        The Notebook

        Michael Wilmington, Chicago Tribune

        "The Notebook," the movie version of Nicholas Sparks' 1996 best seller, may be corny, but it's also absorbing, sweet and powerfully acted. It's a film about falling in love and looking back on it, and it avoids many of the genre's syrupy dangers. This picture, beautifully shaped and shot, filled with fine actors doing moving work, is based on Sparks' debut novel, a "Bridges of Madison County" sort of piece that unfolds in both the past and the present. In the past, two you... (read more)

      • The Expendables 3 poster image

        The Expendables 3

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        No pensions were harmed in the making of "The Expendables 3," the latest in the continuing saga of Sylvester Stallone's mission to provide a work week or two to as many of his old pals as possible. Also these movies make money, so there's a larger imperative. This one reportedly cost $90 million. It looks more like $30 million. I think audiences respond to the general air of cheapness in this franchise; it's part of the fun, the tinny macho ridiculousness of it. The cast list is lon... (read more)

      • Alive Inside poster image

        Alive Inside

        Kenneth Turan, Chicago Tribune

        By Tribune Newspapers Critics, Tribune Content Agency Film Clips Think of them as Lazarus moments. One by one, we are introduced to a series of elderly people with serious dementia. People who've barely said a word in years, who don't recognize their children, who sit around nursing homes like the living dead. Then Dan Cohen does something to them, and it's like a switch has been turned on. They become gloriously happy and alive. As detailed in the joyous, unexpectedly uplifting "Alive I... (read more)

      • Chef poster image


        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        Jon Favreau's "Chef" has one goal: to make you want to eat Cuban sandwiches twice a day for the rest of your life. Meat-eating moviegoers of all palates will have a difficult time controlling their drool, thanks to writer-director-star Favreau's close-ups of a snazzy food truck grill in action, sizzling, sizzling away, the ham looking like heaven, to say nothing of the bread and the pickles. Then, just when things have dried up in the region of your chin, Favreau presents a sequence... (read more)

      • Jodorowsky's Dune poster image

        Jodorowsky's Dune

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        By Tribune Newspapers Critics, Tribune Content Agency Film Clips If I ever go through a wormhole, let me land on a planet where repertory cinema is alive and well and showcasing all the lost, cruelly abridged and, especially, unmade movies conceived on a grand, misbegotten scale. That'd be quite a three-day weekend. Murnau's "4 Devils," followed by von Stroheim's original cut of "Greed," plus the Welles version of "The Magnificent Ambersons." Plus Welles' never-m... (read more)

      • The LEGO Movie poster image

        The LEGO Movie

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        Finally! A comedy that works. An animated film with a look -- a kinetic aesthetic honoring its product line's bright, bricklike origins -- that isn't like every other clinically rounded and bland digital 3-D effort. A movie that works for the Lego-indebted parent as well as the Lego-crazed offspring. A movie that, in its brilliantly crammed first half especially, will work even if you don't give a rip about Legos. "The Lego Movie" proves that you can soar directly into and then stra... (read more)

      • Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones poster image

        Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones

        Mark Olsen, Chicago Tribune

        The scariest thing about some horror movies might be when "5" appears at the end of the title; little good has ever come from that. So it's not surprising the team behind the "Paranormal Activity" films has gone an alternate route, adding a non-numbered secondary title of "The Marked Ones" on the franchise's fifth entry. The wildly successful series of low-budget films has trafficked in a sort of charged mundanity, the movies" found-footage aesthetic based o... (read more)

      • Walking With Dinosaurs poster image

        Walking With Dinosaurs

        Roger Moore, Chicago Tribune

        The BBC series "Walking With Dinosaurs" gets a kid-friendly big-screen treatment, complete with cutesy story and dino-poop jokes, in "Walking With Dinosaurs 3D." Aimed squarely at that dino-crazy demographic (7-12), it pumps a few IQ points into a kid film genre sorely in need of them. "Walking" takes care to ID each new dinosaur species introduced, including factoids about what they ate and any special skills they might have had. It's downright educational. Just... (read more)

      • Oldboy poster image


        Michael Wilmington, Chicago Tribune

        Chan-wook Park's "Oldboy" is a high-voltage Korean saga about an elaborate cat-and-mouse game between a sadistic criminal of seemingly limitless resources and his dangerous prey: a businessman whose life has been brutally stolen from him. Set in modern Seoul, in a noir wilderness full of rain-slick streets, neon restaurants, corrupt gangsters and byzantine hotels, it's a movie of such jaw-dropping violence, wild improbability and dazzling style, it overpowers all resistance. "O... (read more)

      • The Hunger Games: Catching Fire poster image

        The Hunger Games: Catching Fire

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire" is a lot like its own celebrity heroine, Katniss Everdeen, who begins this second "Hunger Games" movie fulfilling a public relations tour as penance for her killer -- literally, killer -- popularity. She is adored by millions; the books are too. The three Suzanne Collins novels, to be spread across four films, are being adapted with both eyes on fidelity to the source material. All "Catching Fire" had to do was to show up, look g... (read more)

      • Free Birds poster image

        Free Birds

        Roger Moore, Chicago Tribune

        "Free Birds" is more proof, as if 2013 needed it, that Hollywood has almost killed the animated goose that laid the golden egg. No matter that in this case the goose is a turkey. You didn't need to be told that. But a year that has produced the clever and heartfelt "The Croods" and the passably amusing "Despicable Me 2" has also had a healthy dose of sausage factory about it. "Epic," "Monsters University," "Planes," "Escape from... (read more)

      • Parkland poster image


        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        We may never know who really was involved in the killing of John Fitzgerald Kennedy. But the opposite poles of the existing theories, cinematic division, stand in clear and livid disagreement. Oliver Stone in ``JFK argued that everybody did it except your mother. And the squishy new drama ``Parkland, a wan human-interest procedural focusing on some of the event's lesser-known players, restates the conclusion of the Warren Commission: That Lee Harvey Oswald, lone gunman, flagrant wing nut, act... (read more)

      • Despicable Me 2 poster image

        Despicable Me 2

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        Older kids and their minion guardians could do worse than "Despicable Me 2," the sequel to the 2010 smash about a supervillain turned adoptive parent. On the other hand, reports of the movie's charm have been greatly exaggerated. It's a reasonably efficient baby sitter, done up in 3-D computer-generated animation of no special distinction. But the first one's weird mixture of James Bond bombast and hyperactive pill-shaped Minions (the protagonist Gru's goggle-clad helpers) had the e... (read more)

      • Coriolanus poster image


        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        By Tribune Newspapers Critics, Tribune Media Services Film Clips With great power comes great responsibility, but powerful men often make for lousy, irresponsible politicians. (Insert personal observations on certain presidential candidates here.) With "Coriolanus," one of William Shakespeare's toughest, most provocative studies in statesmanship, the dramatist created a tragedy (premiering in 1608) built upon the life of a fifth century B.C. warrior who, whether by excess of pride o... (read more)

      • Arthur Christmas poster image

        Arthur Christmas

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        Five years ago, the Bristol, England-based Aardman animation folks -- who created the stop-motion legends Wallace and Gromit and Shaun the Sheep and therefore are eligible for sainthood -- made the digitally animated British/American co-production "Flushed Away." Jampacked with peril, if not with charm, the film had both eyes on a crossover American audience that never materialized. Now comes happier news: a much better film. The company's second digitally animated feature, billed a... (read more)

      • Inside Out poster image

        Inside Out

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        Director Pete Docter's "Inside Out" springs from a single, terrific idea. What if a person's basic emotions were tiny humanoid sprites sharing a command center, a spacious variation on the one in the starship Enterprise but inside the human brain? While the idea isn't new (you may recall the late 20th-century sitcom "Herman's Head," or not), it is vastly adaptable. As the Pixar Animation folks learned a long time ago, before they coupled up with Disney: If your premise has... (read more)

      • Somewhere poster image


        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        Many, including writer-director Sofia Coppola herself, have noted that Coppola's "Lost in Translation," "Marie Antoinette" and now "Somewhere" take place in either literal or (in the case of Versailles) metaphoric hotels, magnets for ennui as well as possibility. In a hotel, as Vicki Baum wrote in her novel "Grand Hotel," nothing ever happens but everything happens in spite of all that nothing. So it is with "Somewhere," a small but, in its wa... (read more)

      • Tron: Legacy: The IMAX Experience poster image

        Tron: Legacy: The IMAX Experience

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        Imagine being "trapped ... inside an electronic arena!" This is how the coming-attractions trailer for the original "Tron" sold the goods back in 1982. Now comes Disney's remake of its cult property, fancied up with 3-D and the high-minded title, "TRON: Legacy." The results impart that "trapped" feeling all too well. It's a sullen affair, dominated by a grim visual palette that intrigues for about 30 minutes. Thereafter I found myself wishing I could sw... (read more)

      • Detestable Moi 3D Numerique poster image

        Detestable Moi 3D Numerique

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        An agreeable jumble, the animated feature "Despicable Me" sells its 3-D in ways you wouldn't call sophisticated or witty. But you certainly notice it. Front car in a roller coaster, up, up, up, then down, down, down -- aaaaahhhhAAAAAAAHHHH!!!!!!!! Like that. And now and then, I like it like that, no matter how dubious this second coming of 3-D is starting to smell. Compared with the restrained sophistication of Pixar's approach to the technology, and in sharp contrast to such murky,... (read more)

      • How to Train Your Dragon: An IMAX 3D Experience poster image

        How to Train Your Dragon: An IMAX 3D Experience

        Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

        The swoops and dives of the exuberant 3-D DreamWorks Animation feature "How to Train Your Dragon," in which the teenage hero breaks all the Viking rules and befriends the winged enemy, should prove as addicting to its target audience as similar scenes have in a little something called "Avatar." Freely adapted from the books by Cressida Cowell, "How to Train Your Dragon" exists to support its flying sequences, just as last year's animated DreamWorks offering, &quo... (read more)

      (152 reviews)

      « Prev 1 2 Next »

      Quick movie browse


        Worldwide movie theaters

        (enter zip)
        AMC Livonia 20
        19500 Haggerty Rd.
        Kaahumanu 6
        275 W Kaahumanu Ave
        AMC Pacific Place 11
        600 Pine St. Suite 400
        Regal Rockville Center Stadium 13
        199 E. Montgomery Ave.